Author: Janet

Injured Workers Who Experience Challenges Returning to Work: Pathways and Consequences

Authors: Rebecca Gewurtz, Stephanie Premji, Linn Holness
Lay summary (abbreviated): The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of injured workers in Ontario who do not return to work successfully following a work-related injury. The findings that emerged from the analysis capture the journeys of injured workers who experience challenging RTW trajectories and describe the implications for injured workers across all areas of their lives, including: (1) Interactions with workers’ compensation and other benefit systems; (2) Financial strain and family relationship; (3) Subsequent health concerns and pressure to return to work, and; (4) Stigma associated with being an injured worker.
iw_and_rtw_crwdp_final_report_oct_19 (5)

Making the Law Keep Down the Costs. Why Canada’s public systems designed to support unemployed workers with a disability are making the decisions that they are.

Author: Andrew King, LLM
Abstract: This paper documents changes made to workers compensation, CPP, EI, and welfare since 1990 by Federal and provincial government in the pursuit of cutting costs. The objective of these changes has been to reduce the entitlement and amount of benefits and bureaucratize adjudication, particularly for those with intermittent, recurring and extended periods of disability. The results contribute to the increasing number of workers with a disability who end up on welfare. This report argues that there are different policy strategies that are more fair and effective in supporting unemployed workers with a disability.
https://www.crwdp.ca/sites/default/files/Research%20and%20Publications/a_king_report_law_rev_final_061516_kp_10.pdf

Injured Workers Who Experience Challenges Returning to Work: Pathways and Consequences

Authors: Rebecca Gewurtz, Stephanie Premji, Linn Holness
Lay summary (abbreviated): The purpose of this study was to explore the experiences of injured workers in Ontario who do not return to work successfully following a work-related injury. The findings that emerged from the analysis capture the journeys of injured workers who experience challenging RTW trajectories and describe the implications for injured workers across all areas of their lives, including: (1) Interactions with workers’ compensation and other benefit systems; (2) Financial strain and family relationship; (3) Subsequent health concerns and pressure to return to work, and; (4) Stigma associated with being an injured worker. iw_and_rtw_crwdp_final_report_oct_19 (5)

Seed Grant Project Report : The Human Rights of Injured Workers: Social Protection Floors and the Canadian Work Disability System

http://www.crwdp.ca/sites/default/files/crwdp_seed_grant_final_report_hilgert.pdf
Author: Jeffrey Hilgert
Summary: This seed grant project funded a Social Protection Floors student fellowship at the School of Industrial Relations at the University of Montreal. The objective of this project was to support a graduate student research project to explore the human rights dimension of social protection for injured workers within the Canadian context while working in partnership with injured worker groups in Canada to further advance their human rights agenda. The result of this seed grant project is a case study that examines recent changes to the benefit determination policy of the Ontario Workplace Safety and Insurance Board under international labour and human rights standards. The primary conclusion drawn from this study is that the injured worker benefit policy changes made by the Ontario WSIB in 2015 appear to raise human rights concerns, but documenting these changes is not yet possible due to the lengthy appeals process faced by injured worker claimants.